Zero Waste

Architecture Firm Creates 4-Story-Tall Whale From Ocean Plastic

Architecture Firm Creates 4-Story-Tall Whale From Ocean Plastic

The Contemporary Art and Architecture Triennial has returned with a splash to the northwest Belgium city of Bruges, featuring poignant works of art and architecture exploring this year’s “Liquid City” theme.

Peppered among the city’s famous canals, medieval buildings and beloved cobblestone streets rises a trail of installations by artists and architects from around the world that will be on display through Sept. 16. At one poignant spot—where the canal dips underground and disappears—rises a particularly noteworthy installation: a breaching, four-story tall whale called “Skyscraper,” made entirely of plastic plucked from the ocean.

Experts Weigh In On Taking Your Kitchen From Wasteful To Waste-Free

Experts Weigh In On Taking Your Kitchen From Wasteful To Waste-Free

It’s easy to succumb to the greenwashing of eco-friendly packaging. 

Buzzwords like recycled, organic, compostable and recyclable convince us to buy additional products just because they say they’re better for the environment. But the central ethos of reducing our impacts and waste have to start with buying high-quality and long-lasting items, and end with nothing getting tossed out (even if it’s being thrown into a recycle bin).

Nowhere in our lives is this process more difficult than in the kitchen. From the excessive packaging on food to the wastefulness of food storage methods, the kitchen ends up being one of the most wasteful zones of the home. Composting is simply not enough to counteract the onslaught of garbage that comes with virtually every meal. So we talked to three heavyweights in the zero-waste movement about how to turn a kitchen from wasteful to waste-free.

Plated: The high price we pay for meal delivery services

Plated: The high price we pay for meal delivery services

At-home meal delivery services have brought convenient, home-cooked meals to the masses.

   But what we’re earning in reduced food waste and controlled cooking experiments come at a huge deficit to the environment through excessive packaging and ice packs—and too often cost us our relationship to the food we eat.

Grub Tubs Turns Restaurant Waste Into Nutrient-Dense Animal Feed

Grub Tubs Turns Restaurant Waste Into Nutrient-Dense Animal Feed

Green Matters has teamed up with WeWork for the month of April to celebrate Earth Day 2018 with a #workgreen challenge and Q&A series spotlighting sustainability-minded WeWork member companies. In this installment, we’re sitting down with Robert Olivier, founder and CEO of Grub Tubs. Olivier has spent the last 17 years developing insect-based technologies; and Grub Hub stands to be his pinnacle achievement. 

Zero Waste Challenge: How to Go Garbage-Free This Month

By Nicole Caldwell for Green Matters

In nature, there is no such thing as waste. In terms of the whole of history, until very recently all organic matter on the planet was consumed by something else, broke down until it became dirt, nourished the soil and plant life, grew into something else, and the whole process repeated itself.

Then people came along who built an economy on the concept of planned obsolescence. We are the only living creatures who make stuff that doesn’t give back to the earth. Too many of the things we make end up in landfills, where they can sit for thousands of years leeching toxins into the soil. A whopping 99% of everything we use ends up in a landfill within six months.

But, it’s possible to live waste-free… or awfully close to it. Here’s how to start.